Visakhapatnam: The state will have a water sports training base near Rushikonda Beach to train the staff in handling tourists at beaches. The base will be used to train water sports aspirants. The Sports Authority of Andhra Pradesh (SAAP) is likely to sign an MoU with Livein Adventures, a city-based firm that conducts water sports activities.
Andhra Pradesh has a limited number of trained people in basic water sports activities and for rescuing people in troubled waters. Currently, the staff, who are handling water sports activities on beaches and other water bodies, are being trained by National Institute of Water Sports, Goa.
On an average, over 1,500 people drown a year in Andhra Pradesh. Most of them are youngsters. Unsafe beaches and lack of swimming culture are leading factors in increasing numbers of drowning cases. However, no concrete steps have been taken by the authorities to prevent drowning deaths.
Founder of Livein Adventures and AP state president for Royal Life Saving Society India, Balaram Naidu, said the state required more skilled persons to handle water sports activities. “Our state needs more lifeguards, beach guards and scuba trainers to tide surfing. The water sports training base will provide training to the staff in water sports activities. People interested in getting a certified course can also receive training here,” he added. Once the base commences in Vizag city, best coaches from various states will be deployed for training. The base will also train in disaster response and deep diving. While Vizag will be the main base for training, a few teams will visit other places to train the interested people depending on the requirement, he said. The SAAP has identified some places in the state to develop as adventure watersports activities such as sailing, surfing, and yachting on the beaches. Recently Byreddy Siddharth Reddy, chairman of SAAP, visited Vizag city and went scuba diving at Rushikonda beach.
On an average, over 1,500 people drown a year in Andhra Pradesh. Most of them are youngsters. Unsafe beaches and lack of swimming culture are the leading factors in the increasing numbers of drowning cases in the state